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NOVA Show Summary, Upcoming Episodes and TV Guide

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NOVA

  • Show status
    Returning Series
  • on network
    PBS
  • Last episode S43E9 aired 2015-11-19
    4 years ago
  • Rating based on 2 user-votes
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NOVA (source: TheTVDB.com)

Last episode:

aired 2015-11-19 (4 years ago)
Making North America: Part 3
Season: 43 | Episode: 9
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Show Summary

Seen in more than 100 countries, NOVA is the most watched science television series in the world and the most watched documentary series on PBS. It is also one of television's most acclaimed series, having won every major television award, most of them many times over.

(Source of summary and banner: TheTVDB.com)

PBS Started: Mar/03/1974
Usually airs on: Wednesday

Type: Documentary
Genres: Discovery/Science Educational
Country: US US
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  • s43e00
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    NOVA documents the April 25, 2015 7.8-magnitude earthquake that ripped through Nepal shaking Mount Everest and unwraps the science behind such deadly earthquakes.
  • s43e09
    • 0.00/5
    4 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    Sorry, currently no summary available for this episode
  • s43e08
    • 0.00/5
    4 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    Sorry, currently no summary available for this episode
  • s43e07
    • 0.00/5
    4 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    Sorry, currently no summary available for this episode
  • s43e06
    • 0.00/5
    4 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    High technology imaging is used to investigate animal mummies buried in Egyptian catacombs.
  • s43e05
    • 0.00/5
    4 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    The explosive details of a World War 1 tunnel attack by the Allies on the trenches of the German lines are investigated.
  • s43e04
    • 0.00/5
    4 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    New and unreported details about modern cyberwarfare are examined.
  • s43e03
    • 0.00/5
    4 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    Expert boat builders assemble and launch a massive reed boat following the directions for building an ark from a 3,700 year old clay tablet.
  • s43e02
    • 0.00/5
    4 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    New clues to the greatest mystery in Arctic exploration--the Franklin Expedition to chart the Northwest Passage--are investigated after a Canadian team discovers one of Franklin’s lost ships.
  • s43e01
    • 0.00/5
    4 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    Sorry, currently no summary available for this episode
  • s42e22
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    4 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    The minute-by-minute story of the Fukushima nuclear crisis told by the employees who stayed behind after an earthquake and tsunami crippled the plant.
  • s42e21
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    4 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    spacecraft New Horizon’s historic flyby of Pluto, the culmination of a nine-year, three-billion-mile journey, reveals the first-ever detailed images of Pluto.
  • s42e20
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    5 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    Sharply rising carbon emissions are entering Earth's seas at a staggering rate, raising their acidity. Learn how scientists are researching the effects and looking for solutions.
  • s42e19
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    5 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    Long before 9/11, a far deadlier, little-known attack from the ocean depths struck our shores, lasting three-and-a-half years and claiming 5,000 lives. Now, famed undersea explorer Bob Ballard, discoverer of the Titanic, investigates the wreck of one of the attack craft, a German submarine that lies at the bottom of the gulf just a few miles off New Orleans. U-166 was part of Operation Drumbeat, a highly successful U-boat operation that caught East Coast cities and shipping almost completely unprepared. Ballard probes the wreck and unravels a dramatic mystery in the official story of the sub's sinking.
  • s42e18
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    5 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    In honor of Hubble's landmark anniversary, NOVA tells the remarkable story of the telescope that forever changed our understanding of the cosmos and our place in it.
  • s42e17
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    5 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    The Great Math Mystery poses the riddle of math's extraordinary power to penetrate the secrets of our universe.
  • s42e16
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    5 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    The show takes a look at Istanbul's resilient architectural symbol, Hagia Sophia.
  • s42e15
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    5 years ago
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    Petra - Lost City of Stone recounts the daring experiment now underway to uncover how the ancient metropolis was built.
  • s42e14
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    5 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    Watch a team re-create a lifting machine and trap-door system to release a wolf into the Colosseum.
  • s42e13
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    5 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    Scientists attempt to find out more about the underlying forces behind sinkholes.
  • s42e12
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    5 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    The show follows efforts to secure, raise and salvage the Costa Concordia cruise ship.
  • s42e11
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    5 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    Scientists upgrade the Large Hadron Collider to higher power in 2015 so that they can look at the world's tiniest particles.
  • s42e10
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    5 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    When Neil Armstrong set foot on the moon, he won instant fame. Yet this accomplished engineer and test pilot was so determined to stay out of the limelight that few know the personal story of how his rare combination of talent, luck and experience led to his successful command of Apollo 11. NOVA presents an intimate portrait of an unassuming American hero through interviews with Armstrong’s family and friends.
  • s42e09
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    5 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    In less than two minutes in March, a one-square-mile field of debris slammed into the Washington state community of Oso, killing 41 and destroying nearly 50 homes. Drawing on analysis of other recent landslides around the world, geologists are investigating what triggered the deadliest U.S. landslide in decades and whether climate change is increasing the risk of similar disasters around the globe.
  • s42e08
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    5 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    To defend himself in the afterlife, the First Emperor of China, Qin Shi Huang, was buried in a vast mausoleum accompanied by around 9,000 life-sized terracotta statues. With exclusive access to groundbreaking new research, NOVA investigates the secrets of how and why the astonishing figures were made and the technology behind the still lethal and highly-advanced crossbows, spears, and swords carried by the clay warriors.
  • s42e07
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    5 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    Follow the paleontologists who are reconstructing this terrifying carnivore, a 53-foot-long behemoth with a huge dorsal sail, scimitar-like claws and superjaws. Bringing together experts in paleontology, geology, climatology and paleobotany, this special brings to life the lost world over which Spinosaurus reigned more than 65 million years ago.
  • s42e06
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    5 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    When World War I began in 1914, the air forces of the opposing nations consisted of handfuls of rickety biplanes from which pilots occasionally took pot shots at one another with rifles. By 1918, the fighter had become an efficient killing machine with a growing strategic impact on the outcome of the war. With the help of a unique collection of meticulously recreated flying replicas, NOVA traces the story of the designers, engineers, and brave pilots caught up in the race to dominate the skies over the western front.
  • s42e05
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    5 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    NOVA re-creates key flights, including the world’s first manned voyage on November 21, 1783. A descendant of the Montgolfier brothers, whose exploits fascinated Benjamin Franklin, will join a team to build an accurate replica of the fragile paper and canvas craft using 18th-century tools and materials.
  • s42e04
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    5 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    As the Ebola epidemic threatens to spiral out of control, NOVA reports from the hot zone, where courageous medical teams struggle to cope with a flood of victims, to labs where scientists are racing to test vaccines and find a cure. Surviving Ebola includes chilling first-hand interviews of what it's like to contract — and survive — this terrible affliction.
  • s42e03
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    5 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    NOVA tells the inside story of the search for Flight MH370 and meets the key players, from all corners of the globe, who have spent months searching for the lost plane. How easy is it to make a plane disappear? Or can new technology guarantee that in the future, nothing will ever be lost again?
  • s42e02
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    5 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    Our lives are going digital. We shop, bank and even date online. Computers hold our treasured photographs, private emails, and all of our personal information. This data is precious -- and cybercriminals want it. Now, NOVA goes behind the scenes of the fast-paced world of cryptography to meet the scientists battling to keep our data safe.
  • s42e01
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    5 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    Diseases that were largely eradicated in the United States a generation ago — whooping cough, measles, mumps — are returning, in part because nervous parents are skipping their children's shots. Vaccines – Calling the Shots takes viewers around the world to track epidemics, explore the science behind vaccinations and shed light on the risks of opting out. The program features scientists, pediatricians, psychologists, anthropologists and parents wrestling with vaccine-related questions.
  • s41e22
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    6 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    NOVA has exclusive access to a unique collaboration among military historians, archaeologists and specialist divers to carry out the most extensive survey of the seabed bordering the Normandy beachheads of June 6, 1944. Dive teams, submersibles and underwater robots will identify key examples of the Allied craft that fell victim to German shellfire, mines and torpedoes. The team will use the latest 3D mapping tools to plot the relics on the sea floor. Highlighting the ingenious technology that helped the Allies overcome the German defenses, D-Day's Sunken Secrets unfolds a vivid account of the tumultuous events of D-Day.
  • s41e21
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    6 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    Colditz Castle, a notorious prisoner of war camp in Nazi Germany, was supposed to be escape-proof. But in World War II, a group of British officers dreamt up an escape plan. The plan was to fly to freedom from the roof of the castle, but the war ended before they could put it to the test. Now a team of aero engineers and carpenters rebuilds the glider in the same attic using the same materials. The program explores the Colditz legend and exposes the secrets of other ingenious and audacious escapes.
  • s41e20
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    6 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    In recent years, an unusual spate of deadly shark attacks has gripped Australia, resulting in five deaths in 10 months. At the same time, great white sharks have begun appearing in growing numbers off the beaches of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, not far from the waters where Steven Spielberg filmed Jaws. To separate fact from fear, NOVA teams with leading shark experts in Australia and the United States to uncover the science behind the great white's hunting instincts. With shark populations plummeting, scientists race to unlock the secrets of these powerful creatures of the deep.
  • s41e19
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    6 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    What makes an animal smart? Many scientists believe the secret lies in relationships. Throughout the animal kingdom, some of the cleverest creatures — including humans — seem to be those who live in complex social groups, like dolphins, elephants and apes. Could the skills required to keep track of friend and foe make animals smarter? To find out, NOVA goes inside the social lives of some of the smartest animals on the planet.
  • s41e18
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    6 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    Humans rely on smell, sight, taste, touch and sound; other animals have super-powered versions of these senses, and a few have extra senses we don't have at all. From a dog that seems to use smell to tell time to a dolphin that can see with its ears, discover how animals use their senses in ways we humans can barely imagine. But it's not just the senses that are remarkable — it's the brains that process them. NOVA goes into the minds of animals to see the world in an entirely new way.
  • s41e17
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    6 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    Today, researchers are discovering that some creatures have mastered skills purportedly restricted to humans. Many are bird brains. Meet a cockatoo with a talent for picking locks; a wild crow on a mission to solve an eight-step puzzle; and a tame raven who can solve a puzzle box so quickly that his performance has to be captured with high-speed photography. Are these skills really evidence of high intelligence or just parlor tricks, the result of training and instinct? To find out, NOVA tests the limits of some of the planet’s brainiest animals.
  • s41e16
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    6 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    A growing number of scientists are discovering that removing top predators from the wild has thrown ecosystems off-kilter, triggering domino effects that scientists are just beginning to understand. NOVA follows scientists who are trying out a simple but controversial solution: returning apex predators — like coyotes, bears and panthers — to their natural environments.
  • s41e15
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    6 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    The dome that crowns Florence's great cathedral of Santa Maria del Fiore -- the Duomo -- is a masterpiece of Renaissance ingenuity and an enduring source of mystery. Still the largest masonry dome on earth, it is taller than the Statue of Liberty and weighs as much as an average cruise ship. More than four million bricks could collapse at any moment -- and we still don't understand how its architect, Filippo Brunelleschi prevented it. To test the latest theories, a team of U.S. bricklayers will help build an experimental mini-Duomo using period tools and techniques.
  • s41e14
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    6 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    Beneath the streets of Rome lies an ancient city of the dead known as the catacombs, a cemetery for the citizens of ancient Rome. In 2002, maintenance workers stumbled through an opening in one of the tunnel walls and discovered a previously unknown complex of six small rooms, each stacked floor to ceiling with skeletons. It was a mass grave, locked away for nearly 2,000 years. NOVA's forensic investigation opens up new insights into the daily life and health of Roman citizens during the heyday of the mighty Roman Empire.
  • s41e13
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    6 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    In the hills of Ireland's County Tipperary, a laborer harvesting peat from a dried-up bog spots the remnants of a corpse — a headless torso almost perfectly preserved and stained dark brown by the bog. Archaeologists recognize it as one of Europe's rare bog bodies: prehistoric corpses flung into the marshes. The corpse eventually will be dated to the Bronze Age, more than 4,000 years ago. Forensic evidence reveals a shockingly violent death. NOVA follows archaeologists and forensic experts in their hunt for clues to the identity and the circumstances of this and other violent deaths of bog body victims.
  • s41e12
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    6 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    On November 8, 2013, Typhoon Haiyan slammed into the Philippines, whipping the islands with 200-mile-per-hour winds and sending a two-story-high storm surge flooding into homes, schools and hospitals, leaving thousands dead and millions homeless. Meteorologists take viewers inside the anatomy of the typhoon, tracking its progress and revealing why the Pacific is such fertile ground for cyclones. NOVA reveals how conditions deteriorated in the storm's aftermath. Disaster preparedness experts and relief workers scramble to understand why the Philippines was so vulnerable.
  • s41e11
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    6 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    In the early days of World War I, Germany launched a new kind of terror campaign: bombing civilians from the sky from Zeppelins. With a team of engineers, explosives experts and historians, NOVA investigates the secrets behind these deadly war machines. The program explores the technological arms race that unfolded as Britain scrambled to develop defenses that could neutralize the threat, while Germany responded with ever bigger and more powerful Zeppelins. Experts reconstruct and detonate incendiary bombs and test-fire antique flaming bullets to discover how the British would finally take down the biggest flying machines ever made.
  • s41e10
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    6 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    NASA's planet-hunting Kepler Telescope has discovered thousands of exotic new worlds far beyond our solar system. Are any of them like Earth? And what sort of life could flourish on them? With vivid animation and input from expert astrophysicists and astrobiologists, NOVA takes you on a mind-bending exploration of these strange worlds and the possible creatures we might one day encounter there.
  • s41e09
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    6 years ago
    03:00- 04:00
    The asteroid that exploded in the skies over Siberia was a shocking reminder that Earth is a target in a cosmic shooting range. These space rocks have the potential to be killers. In a collision with Earth, they could set off deadly blast waves, raging fires and colossal tidal waves. But some audacious entrepreneurs look up at asteroids and see payday, not doomsday. Some asteroids are loaded with billions of dollars-worth of elements like iron, nickel, and even platinum. Will asteroids turn out to be our economic salvation—or instruments of extinction?
  • s41e08
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    6 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    At the Edge of Space takes viewers on a spectacular exploration to probe the earth-space boundary zone, which is home to some of nature's most puzzling and alluring phenomena: the shimmering aurora, streaking meteors, and fleeting flashes that shoot upwards from thunderclouds, known as sprites. NOVA rides with scientists in a high-flying weather observation plane as they hunt for sprites and finally succeed in snaring them in 3D video, gaining vital clues to unravel their mystery.
  • s41e07
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    6 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    For decades, the assassination of John F. Kennedy has fueled dark rumors of conspiracies and mishandled evidence. Now, 50 years later, NOVA asks: Could modern investigators do better? For the first time since the original investigation by the FBI laboratory, NOVA and a team of foremost forensic experts employ sophisticated new technology to reconstruct and review the physical evidence: the weapon, the bullets and the wounds. Exclusive ballistics tests provide important new insights on the controversial single bullet theory.
  • s41e06
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    6 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    Is it possible to engineer an absolutely safe world for ourselves? In SAFER, David Pogue explores the extent to which science and technology can protect us from monumental forces of nature like earthquakes and epidemics. He challenges researchers to save us from dangers of our own making, like traffic accidents and contact sports. Our increasing reliance on the Internet makes us vulnerable to new risks: Pogue delves into cyber security, where computer experts work to shield us from attacks by hackers and terrorists. Risk is all around us, but can we be safer?
  • s41e05
    • 0.00/5
    6 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    Cold is the new HOT, in this brave new world. For centuries we've fought it, shunned it, and huddled against it. Cold has always been the enemy of life, but now it may hold the key to a new generation of science and technology that will improve our lives. In COLDER, David Pogue explores the frontiers of cold science from saving the lives of severe trauma patients and cooling a warming planet to ultracold physics, where bizarre new properties of matter are the norm and the basis of new technologies like levitating trains and quantum computers.
  • s41e04
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    6 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    What happens when engineers open up Nature's toolbox? In WILDER, David Pogue explores bold new innovations inspired by the Earth's greatest inventor, Life itself. From robotic mules and cheetahs for the military, to swarms of robotic bees, Pogue travels the world seeing the wildest ideas put into action in new inventions and technologies. It is a journey that sees today's bacteria turned into tomorrow's metallurgists, viruses building batteries and even DNA, the Code of Life, put to work in living computers. Will the stuff of the future take on a life of its own?
  • s41e03
    • 0.00/5
    6 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    Ever since humans stood on two feet we have had the basic urge to go FASTER. But are there physical limits to how fast we can go? David Pogue wants to find out, and he'll investigate everything from electric muscle cars and ultrafast cameras to quantum teleportation. Along the way, he finds that speed is more than just getting us from point A to B; it's also about getting things done in less time. From the floor of the New York Stock Exchange to UPS headquarters, Pogue's quest for ultimate speed limits takes him to unexpected places.
  • s41e02
    • 0.00/5
    6 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    Was Hurricane Sandy a freak combination of weather systems? Or are hurricanes increasing in intensity due to a changing climate and rising seas? How can we gird cities against future storm surges? Join NOVA on a trip to the Netherlands, a country which has combined extraordinary engineering with natural landscape restoration to protect its low-lying cities from the sea. And meet climate scientists who are racing to understand how a warming world will affect extreme--but unpredictable--weather phenomena like hurricanes and tornadoes.
  • s41e01
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    6 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    NOVA returns to Ground Zero to witness the final chapter in an epic story of engineering, innovation and the perseverance of the human spirit: the completion of One World Trade Center, the skyscraper rising 104 stories and 1,776 feet from the site where the Twin Towers once stood. This update of NOVA's Emmy-nominated special Engineering Ground Zero goes inside the construction of the new tower's final floors and the installation of its soaring, 800-ton spire and beacon.
  • s40e99
    TBA
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    TBA
    For most of our time on Earth, we humans have been the hunted, not the hunters. But today, we have conquered the predators at the top of the food chain; wild bears, wolves and big cats are in retreat. Removing predators from the wild has thrown ecosystems off-kilter, triggering domino effects that scientists are just beginning to understand. Follow scientists who are undertaking a simple, but frightening, solution: returning apex predators such as coyotes, bears and panthers to their natural environments. Will these predators restore the natural balance of their ecosystems -- or threaten the humans who live among them?
  • s40e00
    TBA
    n/a
    TBA
    For most of our time on Earth, we humans have been the hunted, not the hunters. But today, we have conquered the predators at the top of the food chain; wild bears, wolves and big cats are in retreat. Removing predators from the wild has thrown ecosystems off-kilter, triggering domino effects that scientists are just beginning to understand. Follow scientists who are undertaking a simple, but frightening, solution: returning apex predators such as coyotes, bears and panthers to their natural environments. Will these predators restore the natural balance of their ecosystems -- or threaten the humans who live among them?
  • s40e20
    • 0.00/5
    7 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    On May 20, 2013, a ferocious F5 tornado more than a mile wide tore through Moore, Oklahoma, causing 24 deaths and obliterating entire neighborhoods. It was the third time an exceptionally violent tornado had struck the city in 14 years. Yet predicting when and where such killer storms will hit still poses a huge challenge. Why was 2011 -- the worst ever recorded tornado season that left 158 dead in Joplin, Missouri -- followed by the quietest ever year of activity prior to the Moore disaster? Can improved radar and warning technology explain why fewer died in Moore than in Joplin? And will tornadoes get worse as Earth's climate heats up? In this NOVA special, meet scientists in the front ranks of the quest to understand extreme weather events. Also meet storm survivors whose lives have been upended, and learn how we can protect ourselves and our communities for the uncertain future.
  • s40e19
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    7 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    At 2:50 p.m. on April 15, two bomb blasts turned the Boston Marathon finish line from a scene of triumph to tragedy, leaving three dead, hundreds injured and a city gripped by heartbreak and terror. Less than five days later, the key suspects were identified and apprehended, with one dead, the other in custody. How did investigators transform the chaos of the bombing into a coherent trail of clues, pointing to the accused killers? NOVA follows the manhunt step-by-step, examining the role modern technology -- combined with old-fashioned detective work -- played in cracking the case. Given hundreds of hours of surveillance and bystander videos, how did agents spot the bad guys in a sea of spectators? Why couldn't facial recognition software I.D. the criminals? How much could bomb chemistry analysis, cell phone GPS, infrared imagery and crowd sourcing reveal about the secrets behind this horrific crime? With the help of top criminal investigators and anti-terrorism experts, NOVA explores which technological innovations worked -- and which didn't -- in the most notorious case of today, and how the world of crime fighting could be transformed tomorrow.
  • s40e18
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    7 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    After the asteroid impact 65 million years ago -- believed to have wiped out the dinosaurs -- Australia was set adrift on a lonely voyage in southern seas. With host Richard Smith at the wheel, NOVA travels this walkabout continent to uncover how it became the strange island it is today. Australia's many unusual creatures, like the kangaroo and the cassowary, tell a tale of isolation, change and resilience. Australia's long history has seen mountains rise and fall, seas come and go, and whole kingdoms of life triumph and disappear. In this final episode, NOVA races down the last 65 million years to the present day.
  • s40e17
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    7 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    Host Richard Smith comes face-to-face with the previously unknown reptilian rulers of prehistoric Australia. NOVA resurrects the giants that stalked the land and discovers that some of them were among the largest ever to have walked the Earth. Others were some of the most dangerous. In the dry desert heart, scientists unearth an ancient inland ocean, full of sea monsters. But reptiles didn't have the world all to themselves. Mammals like the enigmatic platypus lived alongside them, ready for their day in the sun. And 65 million years ago, that day arrived.
  • s40e16
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    7 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    How did life storm the beaches and dominate planet Earth? Ancient Australian fossils offer clues. While the oceans were teeming, the world above the waves remained an almost lifeless wasteland -- until the Silurian period, when the conquest of the land began. Host Richard Smith introduces Earth's forgotten pioneers: the scuttling arthropod armies that invaded the shores and the waves of green revolutionaries whose battle for the light pushed plant life across the face of a barren continent. Join NOVA's prehistoric adventure as four-legged animals walk onto dry land, with the planet poised for disaster.
  • s40e15
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    7 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    Hidden in the red hills of Australia are clues to the mysteries of Earth's birth, how life arose and how it transformed the planet into the world we now live in. Experts unveil the earliest forms of life: an odd assortment of bacterial slime. Life like this would flood the atmosphere with oxygen and spark the biological revolution that conquered the planet. Travel with NOVA and host Dr. Richard Smith to meet the cast in the first scenes of the great drama of life on earth.
  • s40e14
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    7 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    An unpromising lump of metal found in a 2,000-year-old shipwreck turns out to be an extraordinary treasure: the world's first computer. NOVA follows the ingenious detective work that painstakingly discovered the truth about the ancient Greek device: it was an astonishingly sophisticated astronomical calculator and eclipse predictor, unrivaled until the era of modern science and believed to be from the workshop of Archimedes.
  • s40e13
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    7 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    On the morning of February 15, 2013, a 7,000-ton asteroid crashed into the Earth's atmosphere, exploded and fell to earth across a wide swath near the Ural Mountains. The Siberian meteor was captured by digital dashboard cameras, a common fixture in Russian cars and trucks. Within days, armed with this crowd-sourced material, NOVA crews, along with impact scientists, hit the ground in Russia to hunt for debris from the explosion and clues to the meteor's origin and makeup. Is our solar system a deadly celestial shooting gallery -- with Earth in the cross-hairs? What are the chances that another, even more massive, asteroid is heading straight for us? Are we just years, months or days away from a total global reboot of civilization, or worse?
  • s40e12
    • 0.00/5
    7 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    What makes a person walk into a theater or church or classroom and open fire? What combination of circumstances compels a human being to commit the most inhuman of crimes? As the nation tries to comprehend the tragic events in Newtown, NOVA correspondent Miles O'Brien investigates theories that rampage killers are driven most of all by the wish to die, not the urge to kill. Could suicide--and the desire to go out in a media-fueled blaze of glory--be their main motivation? How much can science tell us about a brain at risk for violence? Most important, can we recognize dangerous minds in time to stop the next Newtown?
  • s40e11
    • 0.00/5
    7 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    This groundbreaking special reveals a spectacular new space-based vision of Earth. Produced in consultation with NASA scientists, Earth From Space takes data from earth-observing satellites and transforms them into dazzling visual sequences, each one exposing the intricate web of forces that sustain life on earth. See the astonishing beauty and complexity of our dynamic planet: how dust blown from the Sahara fertilizes the Amazon; how a vast submarine waterfall off Antarctica helps drive ocean currents around the world; and how the sun's heating of the southern Atlantic gives birth to a colossally powerful hurricane.
  • s40e10
    • 0.00/5
    7 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    Some historians claim that the Egyptian chariot launched a technological and strategic revolution and was the secret weapon behind Egypt's greatest era of conquest known as the New Kingdom. But was the chariot really a revolutionary design? How decisive was its role in the bloody battles of the ancient world? A team of archaeologists, engineers, woodworkers and horse trainers builds and tests two accurate replicas of Egyptian royal chariots. Driving them to their limits in the desert outside Cairo, NOVA's experts test the claim that the chariot marks a crucial turning point in ancient military history.
  • s40e09
    • 0.00/5
    7 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    In the aftermath of his 1927 solo transatlantic flight, Charles Lindbergh became the most famous human being on earth. When he and his wife, Anne, had a son, Charlie, the press dubbed him Little Lindy. On March 1, 1932, kidnappers snatched Little Lindy from the family home near Hopewell, New Jersey. Negotiations stretched out for weeks, but Charlie never returned. His body was discovered not five miles from Hopewell. Now, NOVA is reopening one of the most confounding crime mysteries of all time as a team of expert investigators employs state-of-the-art forensic and behavioral science techniques in an effort to determine what really happened to Lindbergh's baby - and why.
  • s40e08
    • 0.00/5
    7 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    Drones. These unmanned flying robots -- some as large as jumbo jets, others as small as birds -- do things straight out of science fiction. Much of what it takes to get these robotic airplanes to fly, sense and kill has remained secret. But now, with unprecedented access to drone engineers (including a rare interview with the Father of the Predator, Abe Karem) and those who operate drones for the U.S. military, NOVA reveals the amazing technologies that make them so powerful. Discover the cutting-edge technologies that are propelling us toward a new chapter in aviation history.
  • s40e07
    • 0.00/5
    7 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    What happened when the first modern humans encountered Neanderthals 60,000 years ago? In 2010, a team led by geneticist Svante Paabo announced that they had reconstructed much of the Neanderthal genome and the analysis showed that modern humans and Neanderthals had interbred, leaving a small signature of Neanderthal genes in everyone outside Africa today. NOVA explores the implications of this exciting discovery. Were Neanderthals really mentally inferior, as inexpressive and clumsy as the cartoon caveman they inspired? NOVA examines a range of new evidence for Neanderthal self-expression and language, suggesting that we may have underestimated our long-vanished cousins.
  • s40e06
    • 0.00/5
    7 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    The eruption of Iceland's Eyjafjallajökull volcano in 2010 turned much of the northern hemisphere into an ash-strewn no-fly zone. But Eyjafjallajökull was just the start. Katla, an Icelandic volcano 10 times bigger, has begun to swell and grumble. Two more giants, Hekla and Laki, could erupt without warning. Iceland is a ticking time bomb: When it blows, the consequences will be global. Meet scientists trying to understand those consequences -- for air travel and for the global food supply and Earth's climate. Could we be plunged into years of cold and famine? What can we do to prepare for the coming disaster?
  • s40e05
    • 3.00/5
    7 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    Was Hurricane Sandy a freak combination of weather systems? Or are hurricanes increasing in intensity due to a warming climate? How did this perfect storm make search and rescue so dangerous? Inside the Megastorm takes viewers moment-by-moment through Hurricane Sandy, its impact and the future of storm protection. Through first-person accounts from survivors and from experts and scientists, the program gives scientific context to a new breed of storm.
  • s40e04
    • 0.00/5
    7 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    It could be NASA's last chance to set wheels down on Mars until the end of the decade: This August, a rover named Curiosity will touch down inside Mars. Gale Crater, carrying 10 new instruments that will advance the quest for signs that Mars might once have been suitable for life. But Curiosity's mission is risky. After parachuting through the Martian atmosphere at twice the speed of sound, Curiosity will be gently lowered to the planet's surface by a sky crane. This first-of-its-kind system has been tested on Earth, but will it work on Mars? With inside access to the massive team of scientists and engineers responsible for Curiosity's on-the-ground experiments, NOVA will be there for the exhilarating moments after Curiosity's landing -- and for the spectacular discoveries to come.
  • s40e03
    • 0.00/5
    7 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    A remote, bleak speck of rock in the middle of the Pacific, Easter Island, or Rapa Nui, has mystified the world ever since the first Europeans arrived in 1722. How and why did the ancient islanders build and move nearly 900 giant statues, or moai, weighing up to 86 tons? And how did they transform a presumed paradise into a treeless wasteland, bringing ruin upon their island and themselves? NOVA explores controversial recent claims that challenge decades of previous thinking about the islanders, who have been accused of everything from ecocide to cannibalism. Among the radical new theories is that the islanders used ropes to walk the statues upright, like moving a fridge. With the help of an accurate 15-ton replica statue, a NOVA team sets out to test this high-risk, seemingly unlikely theory -- serving up plenty of action and surprises in this fresh investigation of one of the ancient world's most intriguing enigmas.
  • s40e02
    • 5.00/5
    7 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    There is a startling gap between the glamorous television world of CSI and the gritty reality of the forensic crime lab. With few established scientific standards, no central oversight and poor regulation of examiners, forensics in the U.S. is in a state of crisis. NOVA investigates how modern forensics, including the analysis of fingerprints, bite marks, ballistics, hair and tool marks, can send innocent men and women to prison — and sometimes even to death row. Of more than 250 inmates exonerated by DNA testing over the last decade, more than half of the wrongful convictions stemmed from invalid or improperly handled forensics. With the help of vivid recreations of actual trials and cases, NOVA investigates today's shaky state of crime science as well as cutting-edge solutions that could help investigators put the real criminals behind bars.
  • s40e01
    • 0.00/5
    7 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    The Vikings were among the fiercest warriors of all time. Yet only a select few carried the ultimate weapon of their era: the feared Ulfberht sword. Fashioned using a process that would remain unknown to the Vikings' rivals for centuries, the Ulfberht was a revolutionary high-tech tool as well as a work of art. Considered one of the greatest swords ever made, it remains a fearsome weapon more than a millennium after it last saw battle. But how did Viking sword makers design and build the Ulfberht, and what was its role in history? Now, NOVA uses cutting-edge science and old-fashioned detective work to reconstruct the Ulfberht and finally unravel the mystery of the Viking sword.
  • s39e19
    • 0.00/5
    8 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    It contains 99.9 percent of all the matter in our solar system and sheds hot plasma at nearly a million miles an hour. The temperature at its core is a staggering 27 million degrees Fahrenheit. It convulses, it blazes, it sings. You know it as the sun. Scientists know it as one of the most amazing physics laboratories in the universe. Now, with the help of new spacecraft and Earth-based telescopes, scientists are seeing the sun as they never have before and even re-creating in labs what happens at the very center of the sun. Their work will helps us understand aspects of the sun that have puzzled scientists for decades. But more critically, it may help us predict and track solar storms that have the power to zap our power grid, shut down telecommunications and ground global air travel for days, weeks, even longer. Such storms have occurred before--but never in the modern era of satellite communication. Secrets of the Sun reveals a bright new dawn in our understanding of our nearest star--one that might help keep our planet from going dark.
  • s39e18
    • 0.00/5
    8 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    Are you safe aboard a modern cruise ship? Twenty million passengers embark on cruises each year, vacationing in deluxe floating cities that offer everything from swimming pools to shopping malls to ice skating rinks. And the ships just keep getting bigger: The average cruise ship has doubled in size in just the last 10 years. Some engineers fear that these towering behemoths are dangerously unstable, and the recent tragedy of the Costa Concordia has raised new questions about their safety. Now, NOVA brings together marine engineering and safety experts to reconstruct the events that led up to famous cruise disasters, including the ill-fated Concordia, the Sea Diamond and the Oceanos. Are we really safe at sea—or are we on the brink of a 21st century Titanic?
  • s39e17
    • 0.00/5
    8 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    In April 2011, the worst tornado outbreak in decades left a trail of destruction across the U.S., killing more than 360 people. Why was there such an extreme outbreak? How do such outbreaks form? With modern warning systems, why did so many die? Is our weather getting more extreme--and if so, how bad will it get? In this NOVA special, get a look at the science behind the last year's outbreak, meeting those affected and the scientists striving to understand the forces behind the outbreak. Could their work improve tornado prediction in the future? Learn how we all can protect ourselves and our communities in the future.
  • s39e16
    • 0.00/5
    8 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    What are things made of? It's a simple question with an astonishing answer. Fewer than 100 naturally occurring elements form the ingredients of everything in our world--from solid rocks to ethereal gases, from scorching acids to the living cells in our body. David Pogue, lively host of NOVA's popular Making Stuff series and personal technology correspondent for The New York Times, spins viewers through the world of weird, extreme chemistry on a quest to unlock the secrets of the elements. Why are some elements, like platinum and gold, relatively inert, while others, like phosphorus and potassium, are violently explosive? Why are some vital to every breath we take, while others are potentially lethal? Punctuated by surprising and often alarming experiments, David Pogue takes NOVA on a roller coaster ride through nature's hidden lab and the compelling stories of discovery that revealed its secrets.
  • s39e15
    • 0.00/5
    8 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    What will it mean when most of us can afford to have the information in our DNA--all three billion chemical letters of it--read, stored and available for analysis? In Cracking Your Genetic Code, NOVA reveals that we stand on the verge of a revolution. Meet cancer patients returned to robust health and a cystic fibrosis sufferer breathing easily because scientists have been able to pinpoint and neutralize the genetic abnormalities underlying their conditions. What are the moral dilemmas raised by the new technology? Will it help or hurt us to know our genetic destiny? What if such information falls into the hands of insurance companies, employers and prospective mates? One thing is certain: the new era of personalized, gene-based medicine is relevant to everyone. Soon, all of us may be deciding whether to join the ranks of the DNA generation.
  • s39e14
    • 0.00/5
    8 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    This is the incredible story of Trishna and Krishna, twin girls born joined at the head. Abandoned shortly after birth at an orphanage in Bangladesh, they had little chance of survival, until they were saved and taken to Australia by an aid worker. After two years battling for life, the twins are ready for a series of delicate operations, which will prepare them for the ultimate challenge: a marathon separation surgery that will allow them to live truly separate lives. Since the beginning, surgeons knew there was no guarantee of survival for either of the girls - but without surgery there was no hope at all. With exclusive access to this extraordinary human and medical drama, NOVA's cameras have been with Trishna and Krishna and their caregivers at each moment of their journey.
  • s39e13
    • 0.00/5
    8 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    Racing against developers in the Rockies, archaeologists uncover a unique site packed with astonishingly preserved bones of mammoths, mastodons and other giant extinct beasts, opening a window on the vanished world of the Ice Age.
  • s39e12
    • 0.00/5
    8 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    In October 2009, a striking portrait of a young woman in Renaissance dress made world news headlines. Originally sold two years before for around $20,000, the portrait is now thought to be an undiscovered Leonardo da Vinci masterwork worth more than $100 million. How did cutting-edge imaging analysis help tie the portrait to Leonardo? NOVA meets a new breed of experts who are approaching cold case art mysteries as if they were crime scenes, determined to discover who committed the art, and follows art sleuths as they deploy new techniques to combat the multi-billion dollar criminal market in stolen and fraudulent art.
  • s39e11
    • 0.00/5
    8 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    During World War II, Hitler's scientists developed terrifying new weapons of mass destruction. Alarmed by rumors about advanced rockets and missiles, Allied intelligence recruited a team of brilliant minds from British universities and Hollywood studios to a country house near London. Here, they secretly pored over millions of air photos shot at great risk over German territory by specially converted, high-flying Spitfires. Peering at the photos through 3D stereoscopes, the team spotted telltale clues that revealed hidden Nazi rocket bases. The photos led to devastating Allied bombing raids that were crucial setbacks to the German rocket program and helped ensure the success of the D-Day landings. With 3D graphics that recreate exactly what the photo spies saw, NOVA tells the suspenseful, previously untold story of air photo intelligence that played a vital role in defeating Hitler.
  • s39e10
    • 0.00/5
    8 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    In 1943 a squadron of Lancaster bombers staged one of the most audacious raids in history — destroying two gigantic dams in Germany's industrial heartland and cutting the water supply to arms factories — with a revolutionary bouncing bomb invented by British engineer Barnes Wallis. Wallis and the pilots of 617 Squadron dealt a mighty blow to the German war machine. Now, NOVA re-creates the extreme engineering challenges faced by Wallis and the pilots with the aid of six spectacular experiments. Each represents a technical challenge that the Dambusters had to solve to make their mission a success. A team of experts — from dam engineers to explosives specialists — steps into the shoes of the Dambusters. They will adapt a vintage World War II DC4 to carry a bomb the size of an oil drum; train to drop it from a dangerously low altitude in pitch darkness; get it to bounce over obstacles and onto the target; and finally, at a test site in Canada with a 1:6 scale model of one of the German dams, try to repeat history.
  • s39e09
    • 0.00/5
    8 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    Millions of people around the world live in the shadow of active volcanoes. Under constant threat of massive volcanic eruptions, their homes and their lives are daily at risk from these sleeping giants. From Japan's Mount Fuji to the Sleeping Giant submerged beneath Naples to the Yellowstone supervolcano in the United States, travel with scientists from around the world who are at work on these sites, attempting to discover how likely these volcanoes are to erupt, when eruptions might happen and how deadly they could prove to be.
  • s39e08
    • 0.00/5
    8 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    Hard as it is to swallow, cutting-edge theories are suggesting that our universe may not be the only universe. Instead, it may be just one of an infinite number of worlds that make up the multiverse. Brian Greene takes us on a tour of this brave new theory at the frontier of physics, explaining why scientists believe it’s true and showing what some of these alternate realities might be like. Some universes may be almost indistinguishable from our own; others may contain variations of all of us, where we exist but with different families, careers and life stories. In still others, reality may be so radically different from ours as to be unrecognizable. Brian Greene reveals why this radical new picture of the cosmos is getting serious attention from scientists. It won’t be easy to prove, but if it’s right, our understanding of space, time and our place in the universe will never be the same.
  • s39e07
    • 0.00/5
    8 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    Join Brian Greene on a wild ride into the weird realm of quantum physics, which governs the universe on the tiniest of scales. Greene brings quantum mechanics to life in a nightclub like no other, where objects pop in and out of existence and things over here can affect others over there, instantaneously—without anything crossing the space between them. A century ago, during the initial shots in the quantum revolution, the best minds of a generation—including Albert Einstein and Niels Bohr—squared off in a battle for the soul of physics. How could the rules of the quantum world, which work so well to describe the behavior of individual atoms and their components, appear so dramatically different from the everyday rules that govern people, planets, and galaxies? Quantum mechanics may be counterintuitive, but it’s one of the most successful theories in the history of science, making predictions that have been confirmed to better than one part in a billion, while also launching the technological advances at the heart of modern life, like computers and cell phones. But even today, even with such profound successes, the debate sill rages over what quantum mechanics implies for the true nature of reality.
  • s39e06
    • 0.00/5
    8 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    Time. We waste it, save it, kill it, make it. The world runs on it. Yet, ask physicists what time actually is, and the answer might shock you: They have no idea. Even more surprising, the deep sense we have of time passing from present to past may be nothing more than an illusion. How can our understanding of something so familiar be so wrong? In search of answers, Brian Greene takes us on the ultimate time traveling adventure, hurtling 50 years into the future before stepping into a wormhole to travel back to the past. Along the way, he will reveal a new way of thinking about time in which moments past, present, and future—from the reign of T.Rex to the birth of your great-great-grandchildren—exist all at once. This journey will bring us all the way back to the Big Bang, where physicists think the ultimate secrets of time may be hidden. You’ll never look at your wristwatch the same way again.
  • s39e05
    • 0.00/5
    8 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    Space. It separates you from me, one galaxy from the next, and atoms from each other. It is everywhere in the universe. But to most of us, space is nothing, an empty void. Well, it turns out space is not what it seems. From the passenger seat of a New York cab driving near the speed of light to a pool hall where billiard tables do fantastical things, Brian Greene reveals space as a dynamic fabric that can stretch, twist, warp, and ripple under the influence of gravity. Stranger still is a newly discovered ingredient of space that actually makes of 70% of the universe. Physicists call it dark energy because while they know it’s out there, driving space to expand ever more quickly, they have no idea what it is. Probing space on the smallest scales only makes the mysteries multiply down there, things are going on that physicists today can barely fathom. To top it off, some of the strangest places in space, black holes, have led scientists to propose that like the hologram on your credit card, space may just be a projection of a deeper two-dimensional reality, taking place on a distant surface that surrounds us. Space, far from being empty, is filled with some of the deepest mysteries of our times.
  • s39e04
    • 0.00/5
    8 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    He’s been dead for more than 5,000 years — and been poked, prodded and probed by scientists for the last 20. Yet today, Otzi the Iceman, the famous mummified corpse pulled from a glacier in the Italian Alps nearly two decades ago, continues to keep many secrets. Now, through an autopsy like none other, scientists will attempt to unravel more mysteries from this ancient mummy, revealing not only the details of Otzi’s death, but an entire way of life. How did people live during Otzi’s time, the Copper Age? What did they eat? What diseases did they cope with? The answers abound miraculously in this one man’s mummified remains. Join NOVA to defrost the ultimate time capsule, the 5,000-year-old man.
  • s39e03
    • 0.00/5
    8 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    Scientists are on the verge of answering one of the greatest questions in history: Are we alone? Combining the latest telescope images with dazzling CGI, “Finding Life Beyond Earth” immerses audiences in the sights and sounds of alien worlds, while top astrobiologists explain how these places are changing how we think about the potential for life in our solar system. We used to think our neighboring planets and moons were fairly boring — mostly cold, dead rocks where life could never take hold. Today, however, the solar system looks wilder than we ever imagined. Powerful telescopes and unmanned space missions have revealed a wide range of dynamic environments — atmospheres thick with organic molecules, active volcanoes and vast saltwater oceans. This ongoing revolution is forcing scientists to expand their ideas about what kinds of worlds could support life. If we do find primitive life forms elsewhere in the solar system, it may well be that life is common in the universe — the rule, and not the exception.
  • s39e02
    • 0.00/5
    8 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    The earthquake that hit the northern coast of Japan on March 11, 2011, was recorded at magnitude 9.0 — the worst ever recorded in Japan. It generated an unprecedented tsunami, obliterating coastal villages and towns in a matter of minutes. In some areas, the tsunami climbed above 100 feet in height and traveled miles inland. Amazingly, amateur and professional photographers captured it all on video, including remarkable tales of human survival, as ordinary citizens became heroes in a drama they never could have imagined. As the waves rush in, a daughter struggles to help her elderly mother ascend their rooftop to safety; a man climbs onto an overpass just as the wave overtakes his car. These never-before-seen stories are captured in video and retold after the fact by the survivors who reveal what they were thinking as they made their life-saving decisions. Their stories provide lessons for how we should all act in the face of life-threatening disasters.
  • s39e01
    • 0.00/5
    8 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    On the tenth anniversary of 9/11, NOVA presents an epic story of engineering, innovation and the perseverance of the human spirit. With extraordinary access granted by The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, “Engineering Ground Zero” follows the five-year construction of One World Trade Center (1 WTC) and the National September 11 Memorial & Museum. NOVA captures the behind-the-scenes struggle of architects and engineers to make the buildings safe and secure under the pressures of a tight schedule, the demands of practical office space and efficient “green” architecture, and the public's expectations of a fitting site for national remembrance. The program features interviews with 1 WTC architect David Childs; Chris Ward, executive director of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey; Mayor Michael Bloomberg, chairman of the 9-11 Memorial Foundation; and Michael Arad, the man behind the breakthrough concept for the 9-11 Memorial.
  • s38e17
    • 0.00/5
    9 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    Can emerging technology defeat global warming? With more than $30 billion earmarked for “green energy,” President Obama’s stimulus package marks the first serious step by a U.S. administration to tackle the threat of global warming. But as the pace of innovation slackens in the crumbling economy and the public worries more about jobs than the future of the planet, is it all a case of too little, too late? NOVA focuses on the latest and greatest innovations that include everything from artificial trees to cleaner coal, nuclear energy and wildly ambitious — and risky — schemes to re-engineer the entire climate system. Can our technology, which helped create this problem, now solve it?
  • s38e16
    • 0.00/5
    9 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    In its worst crisis since World War II, Japan faces disaster on an epic scale: a rising death toll in the tens of thousands, massive destruction of homes and businesses, shortages of water and power, and the specter of nuclear-reactor meltdowns. The facts and figures are astonishing. The March 11th earthquake was the world's fourth-largest earthquake since record keeping began in 1900 and the worst ever to shake Japan. The seismic shock wave released more than 4,000 times the energy of the largest nuclear test ever conducted; it shifted the earth's axis by six inches and shortened the day by a few millionths of a second. The tsunami slammed Japan's coast with 30-feet-high waves that traveled six miles inland, obliterating entire towns in a matter of minutes. “Japan’s Killer Quake” combines authoritative on-the-spot reporting, personal stories of tragedy and survival, compelling eyewitness videos, explanatory graphics and exclusive helicopter footage for a unique look at the science behind the catastrophe.
  • s38e15
    • 0.00/5
    9 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    Venom scientists are in a race against time. Inside the bodies of many creatures, evolution has produced extremely toxic cocktails, all designed for one reason: to kill. It took millions of years to perfect these ultimate brews of proteins and peptides, and we have only just begun to discover their potential. Now, the race is on to collect and study them before the animals that produce them disappear. But how does venom do its deadly work? NOVA reveals how venom causes the body to shut down, arteries to bleed uncontrollably and limbs to go black and die. But nature’s most destructive and extreme poisons could contain the building blocks for a new generation of advanced drugs that could treat heart attack, stroke, diabetes, obesity and cancer. “Venom” follows two scientists on their expeditions to track down and capture the planet’s most deadly creatures, risking life and limb just to tease out milligrams of venom and get it back to the lab. Find out how nature’s deadliest cocktails could be medicine’s brightest new hope.
  • s38e14
    • 0.00/5
    9 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    On June 1, 2009, Flight AF447, an Air France Airbus A330 flying from Rio de Janeiro to Paris, disappeared over the Atlantic Ocean, taking with it all 228 lives on board. How could a state-of-the-art airliner with elaborate electronic safety and navigation features and a faultless safety record simply vanish without a trace? NOVA assembles a team of seasoned pilots, engineers and safety experts to examine the evidence that emerged in the weeks following this disaster. What led Flight 447’s crew to fly straight into a towering thunderstorm? Using expert testimony, messages transmitted by the doomed plane’s computer system and multi-layered CGI weather reconstructions, NOVA pieces together the events leading up to the catastrophe. With a veteran pilot at the controls of an Airbus simulator, NOVA reconstructs the final moments in the cockpit as the crisis overwhelmed Flight 447’s crew. The program provides a forensic view of crucial events seen from all angles to reveal what really happened on Flight 447.
  • s38e13
    • 0.00/5
    9 years ago
    03:00- 04:00
    NOVA investigates the world of artificial intelligence and profiles the computer that could be the “Smartest Machine on Earth.” Known as “Watson,” this IBM supercomputer is so advanced it’s pursuing the first-of-its-kind challenge competing against “Jeopardy!” champions to prove its uncanny ability to mimic the human thought process.
  • s38e12
    • 0.00/5
    9 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    NOVA - S43E9 What can nature teach us in building smarter materials? Can we create materials that sense and respond? “When describing ‘smart materials,’ one analogy scientists give is the evolution from the first Terminator robot, a machine made of metal and circuitry, to the shape-shifting ‘liquid guy’ in Terminator 2,” said Making Stuff producer Chris Schmidt. Smarter looks into the growing number of materials that can shape themselves–reacting, changing, and even learning. An Army tanker trunk that heals its own bullet wounds. An airplane wing that changes shape as it flies. Clothing that can monitor its wearer’s heart rate, health, and mood. For inspirations and ideas, scientists are turning to nature and biology and producing some innovative new developments in materials science. The sticky feet of geckos have yielded an adhesive-less tape. Studying the properties of skin has led to the development of self-healing protective foam. And Pogue literally goes swimming with sharks to understand a different kind of skin that is intriguing scientists. Scientists are modeling a material after sharkskin to develop an antibacterial film that, when sprayed in hospitals, could eliminate MRSA and other anti-biotic resistant bacteria from clinging to surfaces. Pogue also visits a scientist who has created a material that can render objects invisible. “Smarter” concludes with a vision of the future, the ultimate in “life-like” stuff: programmable matter that could create a duplicate of a human being.
    (Screencap by tvrage.com)
  • s38e11
    • 0.00/5
    9 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    NOVA - S43E9 Most modern materials are dangerous to the environment, but what about cleaning up our world? Batteries grown from viruses, tires made from orange peel oil, plastics made of sugar, and solar cells that cook up hydrogen–these are just a few glimpses of a new generation of clean materials that could power devices of the future. In Making Stuff Cleaner, David Pogue explores the rapidly developing science and business of clean energy and examines alternative ways to generate it, store it, and distribute it. Is hydrogen the way to go? One scientist is even using America’s abundance of chicken feathers to create a cheap way to make hydrogen cars safer. What about lithium batteries? Does this solve an energy problem or create a new dependency–in this case, on South America for a different kind of limited resource than oil? Can scientists instead develop a process in which batteries run on molten salts found in cheap abundance in the U.S. or on genetically engineered viruses? Pogue investigates the latest developments in bio-based fuels and in harnessing solar energy for our cars, homes, and industry in a fascinating hour full of the “stuff” of a sustainable future.
    (Screencap by tvrage.com)
  • s38e10
    • 0.00/5
    9 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    NOVA - S43E9 How small can we go? Could we one day have robots taking “fantastic voyages” in our bodies to kill rogue cells? The triumphs of tiny are seen all around us in the Information Age: transistors, microchips, laptops, cell phones. Now, David Pogue takes NOVA viewers to an even smaller world in Making Stuff Smaller, examining the latest in high-powered nano-circuits and micro-robots that may one day hold the key to saving lives and creating materials from the ground up, atom by atom. Pogue explores the star materials of small applications, including silicon, the stuff of computer chips, and carbon, the element now being manipulated at the atomic level to produce future technology. “Smaller” and more portable stuff has already revolutionized the way we live. The nanotechnology to come could change the face of medicine, with intelligent iPills that know what medicine to release into the body and treat patients from the “inside” based on changing needs; robots that repair damaged body parts; and more.
    (Screencap by tvrage.com)
  • s38e09
    • 0.00/5
    9 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    NOVA - S43E9 What is the strongest material in the world? Is it iron? Are Kevlar and carbon nanotubes the way of the future, or will the powerful properties discovered in natural spider silk one day replace steel? NOVA begins the ambitious four-hour program with a quest for the world’s strongest stuff. Host David Pogue helps viewers understand what defines strength, examining everything from mollusks to a toucan’s beak and testing the world’s strongest materials. Pogue travels from the deck of a U.S. naval aircraft carrier to a demolition derby to the country’s top research labs to check in with the experts who are re-engineering what nature has given us to create the next generation of strong “stuff.”
    (Screencap by tvrage.com)
  • s38e08
    • 0.00/5
    9 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    In 2010, epic earthquakes all over the planet delivered one of the worst annual death tolls ever recorded. The deadliest strike was in Haiti, where a quake just southwest of the capital, Port-au-Prince, killed more than 200,000, reducing homes, hospitals, schools and the presidential palace to rubble. In exclusive coverage, a NOVA camera crew follows a team of U.S. geologists as they first enter Haiti in the immediate aftermath of the tragedy. It is a race against time as they hunt for crucial evidence that will help them determine exactly what happened deep underground and what the risks are of a new killer quake. Barely a month after the Haiti quake, Chile was struck by a quake 100 times more powerful, unleashing a tsunami that put the entire Pacific coast on high alert. In a coastal town devastated by the rushing wave, NOVA follows a team of geologists as they battle aftershocks to measure Earthquake. Could their work, and the work of geologists at earthquake hot-spots around the U.S., lead to a breakthrough in predicting quakes before they happen? NOVA investigates intriguing new leads in its gripping investigation of a deadly scientific conundrum.
  • s38e07
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    9 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    Almost three miles of ice buries most of Antarctica, cloaking a continent one-and-a-half times the size of the United States. If all that ice melted, seas around the world would rise high enough to flood 12-story skyscrapers in places like New York City. Even a ten percent loss of Antarctica’s ice would cause catastrophic flooding of coastal cities unlike any seen before in human history.

    Secrets Beneath the Ice explores whether Antarctica's climate past can offer clues to what may happen to our warming planet. Antarctica's has a surprising climate history. In its distant past, it was ice-free, but around 14 million years ago, ice began overtaking the continent as it began plunging into a deep freeze. So when a massive ice shelf the size of Manhattan collapsed in less than one month in 2002, it shocked scientists and raised the alarming possibility that we may be heading toward an Antarctic meltdown.

    To gather crucial evidence, NOVA follows an ambitious Antarctic investigation--a state-of-the-art drilling probe known as ANDRILL. Drilling deep beneath the Antarctic ice, down through the sea, and three-fourths of a mile into the seafloor, ANDRILL recovers rock cores that reveal intimate details of climate and fauna from a time in the distant past when the Earth was just a few degrees warmer than it is today. As researchers grapple with the harshest conditions on the planet, they discover astonishing new clues--not only about Antarctica’s past, but also Earth’s future. These breakthrough discoveries carry ominous implications for coastal cities around the globe.
  • s38e06
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    9 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    Countless treasure-seekers have set off in search of King Solomon’s mines, trekking through burning deserts and scaling the forbidding mountains of Africa and the Levant, inspired by the Bible’s account of splendid temples and palaces adorned in glittering gold and copper. Yet to date, the evidence that has claimed to support the existence of Solomon and other early kings in the Bible has been highly controversial. In fact, so little physical evidence of the kings who ruled Israel and Edom has been found that many contend that they are no more real than King Arthur. In the summer of 2010, NOVA and National Geographic embarked on two cutting-edge field investigations that illuminate the legend of Solomon and reveal the source of the great wealth that powered the first mighty biblical kingdoms. These groundbreaking expeditions expose important new clues buried in the pockmarked desert of Jordan, including ancient remnants of an industrial-scale copper mine and a 3,000-year-old message with the words “slave,” “king,” and “judge.”
  • s38e05
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    9 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    Dated to the late Stone Age, Stonehenge may be the best-known and most mysterious relic of prehistory. Every year, a million visitors are drawn to England to gaze upon the famous circle of stones, but the monument’s meaning has continued to elude us. Now investigations inside and around Stonehenge have kicked off a dramatic new era of discovery and debate over who built Stonehenge and for what purpose. How did prehistoric people quarry, transport, sculpt, and erect these giant stones? Granted exclusive access to the dig site at Bluestonehenge, a prehistoric stone circle monument recently discovered about a mile from Stonehenge, NOVA cameras join a new generation of researchers finding important clues to this enduring mystery.
  • s38e04
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    9 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    Dogs have been domesticated for longer than any other animal on the planet, and humans have developed a unique relationship with these furry friends. We treat our pets like a part of the family, and we feel that they can understand us in a way other animals cannot. Now, new research is revealing what dog lovers have suspected all along: Dogs have an uncanny ability to read and respond to human emotions. What is surprising, however, is new research showing that humans, in turn, respond to dogs with the same hormone responsible for bonding mothers to their babies. How did this incredible relationship between humans and dogs come to be? And how can dogs, so closely related to fearsome wild wolves, behave so differently? It’s all in the genes. Dogs Decoded investigates new discoveries in genetics that are illuminating the origin of dogs—with revealing implications for the evolution of human culture as well. NOVA also travels to Siberia, where the mystery of dogs’ domestication is being repeated—in foxes. A 50-year-old breeding program is creating an entirely new kind of creature, a tame fox with some surprising similarities to man’s best friend. Dogs Decoded reveals the science behind the remarkable bond between humans and their dogs and spurs new questions about what this could mean for our relationships with other animal species.
  • s38e03
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    9 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    How do elevators work? Are they safe? Why are so many people afraid of them? Across North America, elevators move 325 million passengers every day, and most of the time, people don’t give them a second thought. In Trapped in an Elevator, NOVA reveals the secret life of these ubiquitous machines and investigates personal stories of those who have been caught inside when they do fail. NOVA cameras ride the world’s fastest elevator to the top of the Burj Dubai, the world’s tallest building, and test whether the Burj’s elevator system is ready for the task of moving people to unprecedented heights. On the other side of the world, NOVA follows one of the thousands of elevator maintenance crews in Manhattan that keep New Yorkers moving up and down every day. Then, at the Otis Test Tower—a 28-story high-rise that’s the most over-elevatored building in the world—viewers experience a few heart-pumping moments as a test elevator is sent into free fall. Once brawny but simple machines, elevators are getting a brainy makeover. Computer controls, like those in the elevators at the Marriott Marquis in Times Square, are getting passengers to their destinations faster and more safely than ever before. But will the elevator-wary be comfortable handing over the reins to computers?
  • s38e02
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    9 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    With special access to the site of the San José, Chile, mine, the mining engineers and the miners’ families, NOVA chronicles the miners’ 69-day ordeal and the work of a global team of engineers who struggled tirelessly around the clock in a desperate bid to bring the trapped miners safely to the surface.
  • s38e01
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    9 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    How did medieval builders reach such spectacular heights using only hand tools to create the great cathedrals? The filmmakers behind NOVA’s award-winning documentary Secrets of the Parthenon take viewers on a dazzling new architectural journey, inside those majestic marvels and jewels of Gothic architecture. Carved from a 100 million pounds of stone and sometimes more than 100 years in the making, some now teeter on the brink of catastrophic collapse. To save them, an international team of engineers, architects, art historians, and computer scientists searches the naves, bays, and bell-towers for clues to how the dream of these temples of human achievement and artistry became a reality. NOVA teams perform hands-on experiments to learn the architectural secrets that the cathedral builders used to erect their towering, glass-filled walls and reveal the hidden formulas, drawn from the Bible, that drove medieval builders ever upward.
  • s37e18
    • 0.00/5
    10 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    Sorry, currently no summary available for this episode
  • s37e17
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    10 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    NOVA - S43E9 Sorry, currently no summary available for this episode
    (Screencap by tvrage.com)
  • s37e16
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    10 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    NOVA - S43E9 In this two-hour special, NOVA examines how a simple instrument, the telescope, has fundamentally changed our understanding of our place in the universe. What began as a curiosity—two spectacle lenses held a foot apart—ultimately revolutionized human thought across science, philosophy, and religion. Hunting the Edge of Space takes viewers on a global adventure of discovery, dramatizing the innovations in technology and the achievements in science that have marked the rich history of the telescope.

    (Screencap by tvrage.com)
  • s37e15
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    10 years ago
    01:00- 02:00
    NOVA - S43E9 Three centuries of engineering have enhanced Galileo's simple spyglass, resulting in powerful telescopes that sit on mountaintops, orbit the Earth and circle other planets.
    (Screencap by tvrage.com)
  • s37e14
    • 0.00/5
    10 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    NOVA - S43E9 Sorry, currently no summary available for this episode
    (Screencap by tvrage.com)
  • s37e13
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    10 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    Sorry, currently no summary available for this episode
  • s37e12
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    10 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    NOVA - S43E9 Sorry, currently no summary available for this episode
    (Screencap by tvrage.com)
  • s37e11
    • 0.00/5
    10 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    NOVA - S43E9 Sorry, currently no summary available for this episode
    (Screencap by tvrage.com)
  • s37e10
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    10 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    Did the ancient Egyptians, who built elaborate barges to sail down the Nile, also have the expertise to embark on a long sea voyage? NOVA follows a team of archeologists and boat builders as they reconstruct the mighty vessel shown on the mysterious carving and then finally launch it in to the Red Sea on a unique voyage of discovery
  • s37e09
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    10 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    NOVA announced that a routine test dive in the waters near Pearl Harbor has uncovered a find that could rewrite the history of the Japanese attack on the U.S on December 7, 1941, which claimed the lives of more than 2,400 Americans and drew the nation into World War II. A team of researchers on an
    underwater expedition led by NOVA recently discovered three sections of mysterious steel wreckage deemed by experts to be the unaccounted-for fifth and final Japanese midget submarine used against the U.S. in a top-secret mission to attack the American fleet from below on that day
  • s37e08
    • 0.00/5
    10 years ago
    02:00- 03:00
    Sorry, currently no summary available for this episode